On Writing This Week: How to Write Your Way to the Top of Your Industry + more

funa Here’s what we loved on the internet this week:
It’s Column Contest Time Again!

at McSweeney’s Internet Tendency

We are looking for material that is engaging and interesting, in a “we know it when we see it” way. It would probably be a mistake to look at our current columns and try to replicate them. We love those columns, but they came about by authors simply following their own paths. Engage the subject matter you’re interested in, in the way you find most compelling. Our site is primarily known for printing funny things, but columns need not be comic in nature. They don’t even need to be writing, as we have begun to feature more graphic-based material. Read on for full guidelines >>

The Simple Secret to Beating Impostor Syndrome

by Lauren Tharp at Be a Freelance Blogger

Don’t worry. Impostor Syndrome isn’t fatal.

Well… Not in the physical sense anyway. It could be fatal to your career.

According to Wikipedia‘s collective genius, Despite external evidence of their competence, those with [impostor] syndrome remain convinced that they are frauds and do not deserve the success they have achieved. Proof of success is dismissed as luck, timing, or as a result of deceiving others into thinking they are more intelligent and competent than they believe themselves to be.

Sound familiar?

Unfortunately, this poses a major problem to writers. Read more >>

How to Write Your Way to the Top of Your Industry

by Pamela Wilson at Copyblogger

Jeff Goins is right: you are a writer as soon as you decide to take your writing seriously.

Even if you don’t plan to hang out a shingle and make your living writing for other people, if you approach the writing you do for your own business like a pro, your work will improve steadily over time.

That means studying freely available resources on writing. It means investing small amounts in building a reference library of writing books.

And it means approaching your writing like it’s vital to the success of your business (because it is). Read more for writing resources >>

Generosity Works: Results from Launching a “Pay What You Want” eBook

by Tom Morkes at ThinkTraffic

In April of 2013 I finished up with another product for my readers.

It was a book, but not by any conventional standards.

It wasn’t 200 pages, there was no story arc, it was purposely concise (almost to the point of being abrupt), and the truth is a lot of people probably weren’t going to like it.

It was a collection of my notes, sketches, and ruminations from 2 days I spent with Seth Godin in the fall of 2012.

Initially, I wasn’t going to publish this content, but as I began organizing my notes, I realized how much business-transforming material I had at my fingertips. It seemed selfish to keep it to myself, so I brainstormed ways to package and spread the information as generously as possible.

So I transcribed over 50 pages of notes into a word document. I figured I’d spend a couple hours putting the notes into a blog post and simply hit publish.

But, as with most things I create, one thing lead to another and pretty soon this simple blog post turned into a massive eBook project.

Instead of a few hours of work, it took months. Read more >>

The One True Path to Writing Success?

by Ali Luke at Aliventures

Want to know the secret?

There is no one true path. There is no one right way.

Sure, some bestselling authors / writing tutors / self-proclaimed gurus might insist that their way is the way … but it isn’t.

If you’re a parent, you’ll know that there is a ton of contradictory advice out there. (Gina Ford vs attachment parenting, anyone?) There are also plenty of tips that your best friend might swear by, but which simply don’t work for you and your family.

The writing world is the same. Sometimes, experts completely disagree. Other times, their tips may not work at all for you – at best, they’re useless; at worst, they’re actively harmful.

During my time as a writer, I’ve come across a fair few dictums that really aren’t as great as some people would have you think . . . Read more >>

Did you come across any must-reads this week? Share them in the comments!
DIY Writing shares resources, tips, and tools for writers in search of a path. Want more? Subscribe to updates + get our free e-guide!
 

About Dana (@danasitar)

Dana is the creator of DIY Writing, editor of Writer's Bucket List, and author of A Writer’s Bucket List. She helps creative entrepreneurs build a thriving community around their Big Ideas through courses, coaching, and books in digital publishing.

Comments

  1. I am honored to be included on this list. Thank you SO much! :)

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